40D of sadness is now happy.

9 11 2009

I should have updated this a week ago, but my camera is back in fine working order. Thanks to our friend, Lee, It was sent off to Canon, quoted on, repaired and delivered back to me all in the space of about 2 weeks.

Final cost? Pretty well bang on the estimate at W380,000 including shipping.

What did they do? From what I can gather they replaced the whole “mirror box”, seeming the entire guts of the camera from the shutter forwards.

Does it work? Yup, as good as, or better than ever. Everything is sparkling clean inside and if anything, it feels slightly more solid now. Mounting lenses is a slightly tighter fit, with more of a machined finish, in no way a bad thing. So far I haven’t taken many pics, but focus seems spot on, which was my biggest concern.

All up, great work from Canon Korea.

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The 40D of sadness

22 10 2009

Yargh, Urgh, AAAARGH.

Maybe it was in retaliation for purchasing a small point and shoot camera the week previous, or maybe it was just irritated with 2nd grade too, but no matter the reason, my Canon 40D decided that enough was enough. Shooting in sports mode (6.5fps) the first 2 pics worked and then it jammed. The mirror inside seems to have lost one of its hinge points, and now is jammed into the body. No moving mirror, no pictures = expensive fix.

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You can see the mirror in the pic. Mine seems to have jammed off center, with the top left hinge probably being broken. Result? the mirror no longer swings up when a photo is taken.

Usually when you push the shutter, the autofocus does it thing, the camera calculates the exposure, the mirror flips up and then the shutter fires. Now mines still does all of that with the exception of the mirror. So all photo’s consist of just the top 10% of the frame, where light leaks past the faulty mirror.

Never a good feeling when your expensive toy decides to break.

Still, help was on hand. As it was obviously time to send it back to Canon for some TLC I went to see my friend Lee, who runs our local photo/computer store. He helped my out greatly by calling Canon, organising it to be sent back for evaluation and a quote.

Warranty? Unfortunately no. I bought it about 18 months ago, grey market from the markets in Yongsan. Basically I saved about W400,000 by buying a Japanese domestic market body. Very much worth saving. Even so, it would be out of warranty anyway.

Well, it was sent on Friday, was inspected and quoted on Tuesday and I should get it back this week. Amazingly fast. But how much? This much :

W376000.jpg

Thats W376,000, or about AU$350. About what I expected really. They are replacing the whole mirror box, so it should come back better than new and hopefully much cleaner. This is where I’m thankful to be in Korea. I’ve heard some bad stories about Canon Australia and the long slow process of repairs. Especially repairs to overseas bought cameras.

So it should all turn out ok, except for the wonderful out of pocket $$$. Isn’t it funny how every single month something crops up to cost $300 or $400 that you were not expecting.

I’m looking forward to getting my camera back and taking more pics. It feels strange using a small point and shoot camera, its just not the same sense of taking a photo. That physical feeling that you just don’t get with an all electronic camera.





Hagia Sophia, in Pink

18 09 2009

Just playing with some filters in aperture and came up with this. Not sure why but I think it works.

The photo is of Istanbul’s Hagia Sophia Cathedral/Mosque/Museum getting on towards sunset.

Hagia Sophia in Pink





Istabul, its great

29 07 2009

Well, we made it. Istanbul. City on two continents.

We’ve been here a few days so far, and have begun our Intrepid adventure. More on that later. First just some pics of Istanbul.

The Blue Mosque with cat

Istanbul's Blue Mosque

2 of Turkeys most famous things, Turkish coffee and Baklava. Both excellent and well worth making a trip to Istanbul to enjoy.

Coffee and Baclava

Another of Turkeys famous things, doner kebabs (actually chicken in this case).

Lunch, delicious.

And of course the most famous church/mosque at least in this country. One of the biggest around, currently the 4th biggest in the world, and its almost 1500 years old!

Hagia Sophia Exterior

Notice the varied artworks. Some christian which were covered up during conversion to a Mosque, and the obvious arabic writings on the round shields.

Hagia Sophia

Hagia Sophia ceiling

Hagia Sophia Interior

It all used to be lit with candles and oil lamps, now all electric of course.

Chandeliers, light and ceiling

In some cases the christian decorations and mosaics have been uncovered, after they were covered in plaster to hide them.

Recovered Cross

This is the Mimber, the equivalent of the pulpit in a christian church.

The Mimber, Hagia Sophia

On the way out are these stunning mosaics and wall paintings

Hagia Sophia ceilings

One more pic, this time of the safest street I’ve ever seen (sorry, I had to say it)

A very safe street





Total eclipse of the heart

22 07 2009

Actually a partial eclipse of the sun.

What a perfect start to a vacation. This evening we head to Seoul and on to Turkey, and this morning is a partial 85% complete eclipse. And I didn’t even know about it until yesterday.

More messing around with the camera to get these shots. Thank you very much Mr ND400 9 stop filter. Shot at ISO100, f25, 1/125sec with stacked ND400 and CPL.

Korean Eclipse

Partial Eclipse

More on Turkey when we get there 🙂





New toy, like sunglasses for your camera

7 07 2009

I read a few weeks ago about using ultra dark camera filters in order to do daylight long exposures. Well, i’ve been thinking about it for a while and decided to splurge. So, here it is.

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Yup, a Hoya ND400 filter. 9 full stops of light killing power. This thing is dark. Should be a bit of fun to play around with.

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Hoya say that :

Photographing solar eclipses and ultra-bright light sources can be extremely dangerous. This filter reduces light values by 9 stops to less than 1/500th of its original intensity and allows safe photography. It can also be used to achieve super slow shutter speeds in daylight to render moving subjects invisible.

Lets hope the sun comes out tomorrow so I can blot it out with this beastie.